How much are you willing to spend on Valentine's Day?

February 12, 2019 - 11:50 am
Categories: 

PHILADELPHIA (RADIO.COM) — Whether you love it, hate it or just always manage to forget it, Valentine’s Day is big business. 

Feb. 14 is a huge day for the world’s florists and chocolatiers, but you might not know just how big. Here’s a look at just how into Valentine’s we all really are and how much we’re willing to spend to express our love.

$20.7 billion

That’s the total amount of money that people plan to spend for Valentine’s Day, according to the National Retail Federation. That’s the same as the gross domestic product of Papua New Guinea.

$162 per person

The NRF survey found that fewer people were going to celebrating Valentine’s Day this year, but they were going to be spending a lot more on their loved ones — that number ticked all the way up to $162.

$1.8 billion on candy

An analysis by WalletHub found that massive cavity waiting to happen. That’s a lot on sweets. And, heaven help us, the most popular candy in America, according to more than a decade of sales data, is a package of chalky conversation hearts.

$1.9 billion on flowers

In another eye-popping Valentine’s Day stat, according to Proflowers some 75 percent of all the roses sold in the U.S. are sold around Feb. 14.

$3.9 billion on jewelry

While fewer people buy jewelry than flowers or candy — only 18 percent of people said they’re buying jewelry for their special someone — they spend a lot more on it.

$6.94 on pets

If you and yours are going to be busying yourself with other Valentine’s Day activities, you should probably get a bone or a Kong full of peanut butter for your fur baby.

Lots and lots of marriage proposals

It is the second most popular day of the year to get engaged, and surveys put the number of proposals somewhere between 6 and 9 million.

A bunch of disappointed people

Bad news for anyone who feels most loved when they receive stuff. While 40 percent of people want gifts for Valentine’s Day, only 25 percent plan to give them. Our deepest condolences if you are part of the 15 percent of people who are left wanting this year.