Boeing 737 Max 8 groundings starting to impact Thanksgiving travel

John McDevitt
August 08, 2019 - 4:00 am
MIAMI, FLORIDA - MARCH 13: An American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 is seen as it pulls into its gate after arriving at the Miami International Airport from LaGuardia Airport on March 13, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) —  If you booked a flight this Thanksgiving, there could be schedule changes due to the grounding of Boeing's 737 Max 8 planes. 

Airlines have been notifying many of their customers that flights they have booked have been cancelled due to the grounding. They're reallocating aircraft on certain routes and in many cases, bringing back older 757s or MD88s to handle the loads. 

Many passengers are already getting notification of flight changes during Thanksgiving travel time. 

That means, for example, your morning flight could now be a night flight.   

"They're going to actually reallocate aircraft on certain routes, bringing back older 757s or MD88s to handle the loads," said Peter Greenberg, travel editor for CBS News.

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"The airlines are doing a very, very good job of preemptively realizing what is going on, contacting customers and re-booking them. However, if the re-booking results in you not being able to get to where you want to go, when you want to go, then the airlines have been very, very good in at least either refunding your money or giving you a penalty-free opportunity to use that ticket at a later date," Greenberg said.  

"The cancellations problem is not over yet and it may not be over until the second quarter of next year," Greenberg advised. 

He added that passengers shouldn't wait for airlines to call them — they should contact their airlines and figure out what options they have regarding their flights. 

Greenberg said the older planes being used to accommodate passengers are not fuel efficient and that could mean a fare increase in the future.

AAA Mid-Atlantic said changes can be made at any time and advised passengers to check with their airlines before traveling.