Krasner talks progress, reform within legal system for LGBTQ communities

Shara Dae Howard
November 19, 2018 - 6:35 pm
Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner has been living up to his progressive reputation, and, he says, his vision is all about equality.

Shara Dae Howard/KYW Newsradio

Categories: 

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner has been living up to his progressive reputation, and says his vision is all about equality.

Krasner is making some changes and calling out hypocrisy, and says his office is facing down hate and those who stir it up.

"I'm thrilled that this office is stepping up, that some of the watches that were set to 1954 have been replaced by watches made sometime in this century," he said. 

His office hosted the first of what may be many CLE sessions, or Continuing Legal Education for lawyers. 

Kelly Burkhardt with the district attorney's office says this time, the sessions were focused on educating lawyers on the unique needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people within the prison system.

"It's necessary because LGBTQ individuals are a part of all facets of the justice system. We created a broad strokes panel in which we talk about overall LGBTQ competency and digging down into what happens in the legal sphere," Burkhardt said. 

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner has been living up to his progressive reputation, and, he says, his vision is all about equality.
Shara Dae Howard/KYW Newsradio

Burkhardt explains that Pennsylvania has no legislation for hate crimes against LGBTQ people, and both Burkhardt and Krasner say they hope these sessions will help lead to better understanding and legislation to attend to the unique needs of the LGBTQ communities.

"We're obviously open to all input we can get. Hate crimes and conditions in jail to how people are treated in a courtroom, because we want to go in the other direction of those stirring up hate," Kraser said. 

In line with his visions of progress, Krasner recently withdrew his office from Pennsylvania's largest prosecutors association, saying the advocacy group has supported regressive or overly punitive policies and represented "the voice of the past."