Museum to host program on girls' access to science education

Molly Daly
February 25, 2019 - 5:56 pm
Wagner Free Institute of Science and the Consortium for History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Courtesy of David Graham, Wagner Free Institute of Science

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PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — A North Philadelphia natural history museum - which was founded in the 1800s on the belief that education in the sciences should be open to everyone - will host an event March 7 exploring the history of girls' education in the sciences, the challenges they face and strategies to boost their participation. 

The event, presented by the Wagner Free Institute of Science and the Consortium for History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, is called Rewriting the Story of Girls' Education in STEM: Past Through Present. 

The Wagner's Coryn Wolk says they've paired a historian with an education researcher.

"Kim Tolley of Notre Dame de Namur University, and Natalie King from Georgia State University," Wolk said. 

Tolley will explore how, in the early 19th century, more girls than boys studied science in secondary schools, a trend that had reversed by the 1930s.

King will focus on engaging girls of color in STEM through civic leadership, activism, and mentoring.  

Wolk says she expects the audience will leave with a lot to think and talk about.

"Probably it will change your perspective on how we've gotten to where we are in terms of the state of girls in science, or even what people currently believe girls can do in science and math," Wolk said. 

The program's free, but you're encouraged to register here.