You can cast your ballot in Pa. if you aren't currently serving time, felony conviction

Shara Dae Howard
November 05, 2018 - 6:44 pm
 Pennsylvania is one of few states that extends voting rights to incarcerated citizens and those on parole.

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PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Pennsylvania is one of few states that extends voting rights to incarcerated citizens and those on parole.

Across the nation, each state's voting rules vary, and eligible voters can find that their particular state's rules are difficult.

For those who are incarcerated, on parole or awaiting trial, things can be even more confusing. But in Pennsylvania, voting rules are less restrictive. 

"Unless someone is currently serving their sentence for a felony conviction on voting day, they are eligible to register and cast a ballot," said Patrick Christmas of the Committee of Seventy. "That includes folks who are behind bars at the time, who are awaiting trial, folks who have been convicted of a misdemeanor but not a felony." 

And like any other voter, "If someone with a criminal record shows up to vote on Election Day, they shouldn't need anything that the typical voter does not," he said.